Saturday, 5 May 2018

Financial Times

Last week I was asked to create an illustration for the Financial Times Weekend book review section (I know, you're thinking 'oh my god' an update about work that didn't happen six months ago! I'm trying guys). The book was Curtis Sittenfield's 'You think it, I'll say it' which is a collection of short stories, so a little difficult to illustrate. I loved creating the roughs for this, its not often that I illustrate character interaction like this. I wanted to create a lot of tension between the two, so I played with a lot of scale and also objects, such as the rear view mirror and democratic elephant air freshener to slice through the two, disrupting the kiss and setting up an opposition. I read these kind of stories and columns all the time and think it's really good practice for any illustrator to read news papers as you're always forming these images in your head even when you're not illustrating them. Such a great commission with a pretty fast turn around but I found the ideas came pretty easily and am really happy with how it turned out. Here's the final.


And here are the roughs.







Tuesday, 27 February 2018

Beings Magazine

I finally got my hands on a (well actually two) copies of the very first issue of Beings Magazine and it has not disappointed! Honestly really blown away by the whole magazine and my illustrations look great, the colours are spot on and the attention to detail throughout makes it such a rich, sleek, exciting publication, I'm sure it will be one of the most coveted items for anyone who loves travel. You can head over to their website here to grab your copy now. Here's the final image in context and some of the roughs too.



  


 











Friday, 22 September 2017

Super secret (but not for too long) project update

So I'm working (yes I know again) on a super secret project, although this one won't be secret for too long. You'll actually only have to wait until mid October to find out a bit more, but it will be worth it.

I do feel like a little bit of a broken record on this blog, but I am super excited for this project! That's just the perks of doing something that you love, that you genuinely get really excited everyday (well not everyday) about working.

Anyway what I can tell you about this project is that it is very in keeping with me and my loves/likes; lots of traveling, lots of experiences, lots of adventure and my illustrations have just seemed to click and fall into place so perfectly. I had the roughs ready early and sent them over to the client yesterday afternoon ahead of schedule, which is pretty much a cardinal sin in the terms of freelance, but I was just so excited that I didn't want to wait until next week for feedback. Then I got one of the greatest pieces of feedback that made me even more excited and grateful to be part of this. So yeah, still not really a lot of information but an update and I'm trying to be consistent here guys.







Sunday, 10 September 2017

iPad Pro, Apple Pencil and Illustration

I decided to do a little write up about the iPad Pro and Apple pencil because its really changed my process of working. Before I start I want to stress that this isn't really a review of the iPad itself but more of my reasons for getting the iPad and Apple pencil and how its integrated with my illustration practice. So anybody looking for a reliable review on the pencil calibration or how it matches up to the Wacom or similar, Google is your friend :)

So for quite a while I felt as if I needed to make more of a switch to digital work, there's a number of reasons for this:
  1. The industry as a whole is progressively becoming more digital and I want to remain current
  2. It's cleaner. Working in collage is great but boy can it be really annoying when you're trying to get a flat colour and then you smear it with glue marks
  3. Mistakes, there's no backspace in real life guys
  4. Resolution, integrating digital elements means I can work on a much greater scale and ensure that my files are at the highest resolution. If anyone has ever scanned in a magazine print, then you'll see that even if its scanned to the highest quality, if the pixels aren't there then the image just becomes stripey and pixelated.
  5. Ease of use. Collage is so tricky to work with in different environments, going outside in the sunshine seems like a great idea to make work but then along comes a gust of wind and the idea suddenly become terrible. I also find it really hard to figure out colour palettes by sifting through piles and piles of papers. Some quick tests on the iPad are so much easier. And it means I can pick up my ipad and go where ever, whenever without having to plan or pack up all my stuff. I love working downstairs with my boyfriend and I can do this with my ipad without having to lumber all of my papers and collage and laptop and everything else (or have to clean up after myself!).

My work has always involved digital techniques; I clean up smears and paper joins, add various layers of more collage, draw elements using my wacom, but the iPad has taken it to a different level and made it that much easier. This doesn't mean that I'm dropping collage either, the main medium of my work is still collage, I'm just adding more digital elements and using the iPad to experiment. 

I'd previously tried to work with an older iPad model and a generic compatible stylus but the results weren't great. The new Apple pencil is a dream to work with. Its so accurate and is pressure sensitive so its super easy to achieve natural looking lines and paint strokes. The dual sensors in the tip of the pencil and the surface of the iPad pick up not only on the pressure but also the angle at which you're holding the pencil so you can shade with the side of a pencil or create different thicknesses with the marker pen. The grip feels great and I like that its weighted, it feels solid but glides really easily and smoothly. I was worried about the friction, or lack of, between the pencil tip and iPad surface as this was something I really disliked when using a generic stylus but I was presently surprised. The matte tip of the pencil helps to give more of a resistance against the tablet surface. It's still not quite the sensation of a pencil over the grain of paper but I know there are a lot of matte screen protectors available at a relatively small price. 

So far its made a great impact on my my work and my process of creating work so keep your eyes peeled for an influx of new work!






Tuesday, 29 August 2017

Rouleur issue 17.6

Latest set of illustrations for Rouleur, looking at the growing use of social media among road cyclists and the effects that it has had on the sport. I think I must have said it quite a lot before, but I really love working with these guys. The briefs are super fun and interesting and the images just come really easily.

Below are the final pieces. I'll also include a few of the roughs at the end. Before I've been a bit reluctant to share any rough work just because there may be the chance to recycle the idea or composition with another brief, but these are pretty specific so should be safe. My process of work took a bit of a dramatic shift from my usual approach and the iPad Pro and Apple Pencil were the only materials I used to create the roughs. As I mentioned before, I'm going to do a little write up on the iPad and my practice, but the benefit of using them meant that I was able to focus solely on the ideas and just pick up and create, rather than having to split my time between ideation and sifting through papers, for textures, colours, scanning, working up the roughs slightly etc.











Saturday, 26 August 2017

Drought



Over 20 million people are facing severe famine and starvation due to drought. Climate change is a huge aggravating factor scorching harvests and ruining livelihoods, but we can all help change this!

Wednesday, 16 August 2017

Like the Wind

Here's a recent piece I did for Like the Wind magazine #13. I got to illustrate a really great article by James Dunn (instagram) about using memory and music to help him run and train further. I wanted to convey the solitariness of his process, lost in his own head but enforce he was by no means alone or lonely. The illustration ended up being really striking and quite graphic which I really like, whilst keeping texture and plenty of depth.